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Starving, but only have 500 Yen (5 USD) left in your wallet? Or are you just looking for a restaurant that serves delicious food at a cheap price? Let me show you the ten best cheap restaurants in Tokyo.

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants : Sukiya (すき家)

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Sukiya is a restaurant that serves gyudon (beef bowl). Gyudon is a bowl of rice with onions and slices of beef with sauce on top. Sukiya is a popular fast food chain in Tokyo, with more than 270 locations in the capital. You only need 350 yen to order a regular size of gyudon. You can also order curry and rice or pork and rice without spending more than 500 yen.

Japanese people eating at Sukiya often put a raw egg on the top of the beef bowl. Don’t worry–it’s perfectly fine, and tasty too! When mingling the slices of beef with a raw egg, the rice entirely absorbs the essence of egg and beef sauce. You will find out that you are entirely addicted to this bowl.

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Sukiya Information

You can visit Sukiya’s website here Website (English). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese) and Instagram.

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open 24 Hours.

 

Yoshinoya吉野家

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

If you like gyudon, you will also like Yoshinoya. Yoshinoya is found in 1899. In other words, it is one of the oldest fast food chains in Japan. It also mainly serves gyudon. Comparing to Sukiya, Yoshinoya’s beef is fatter, and the sauce is sweeter. In addition, it will also be a good idea to add some red ginger on the top of the beef in order to kill bacteria in your mouth. But it really depends on your preferences. One thing I really like about Yoshinoya is that the food comes fast because the food will be delivered to you within 5 minutes after you ordered your food.

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Besides gyudon, Yoshinoya serves diverse dishes and also offer seasonal dishes to customers. One weird phenomenon though, ladies usually do not visit Yoshinoya. Thus, when you enter the store, you will see that 95% of the customers are male. Hence, if you feel awkward, grab someone to come with you.

Yoshinoya Information

You can visit Yoshinoya’s website here. Website (English). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese) and Instagram.

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open 24 Hours

CoCo Ichibanya CoCo壱番屋

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

If you don’t like gyudon, CoCo Ichibanya seems like to be another good choice for you. It exclusively serves curry and rice to their guests. But Japanese curry is unique. When people think about curry, they will instantly think about spicy and hot. This is not the case in Japan, particularly in CoCo Ichibanya. You can select spicy and sweet curry. You can also choose the spicy or sweet level of your own dishes. If you want, you are able to add money to increase the size of your rice and choose other side dishes too. Anyway, it only costs you 484 yen to order pork curry and rice.

CoCo Ichibanya Information

You can visit CoCo’s website here. Website (English). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese) and Instagram.

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open 24 Hours

Fuji Soba名代富士そば

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Who don’t want to eat healthy? Fuji Soba is a good place to provide nutritious noodles with economical price because the soba are made of buckwheat, which consist elements that can reduce cholesterol and maintain bone health. It is also beneficial to your digestive system. These are only few from the list; buckwheat can have much more benefits to human bodies.

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Most of the options from the menu are lower than 500 yen. As a result, eating cheap and healthy will not be an issue to you anymore.

Fuji Soba Information

You can visit Fujisoba’s wbesite here. Website (Japanese). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese)Twitter, and Instagram.

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open 24 Hours

Hanamaruはなまる

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Individuals always look for a restaurant that can be sensitive to the needs of guests. Hanamaru is one of them. Guests can always choose either eating a light or heavy udon meal in this fast food restaurant. Hanamaru has listed out the calories that each of their udon set consists.

Hanamaru is a half self-serve restaurant. When you go in, please tell the stuff that which udon set you want. You also need to tell them whether hot or cold udon you want to choose. After they give you the bowl, you can choose your own side dishes, such as tempura and hot spring egg by tongs. If you are thirsty, you can help yourselves to fill up water or tea into your cup. Afterward, you pay and find your own seat.

Hanamaru Information

You can visit Hanamaru’s website here. Website (English). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese)Twitter, and Instagram (Japanese).

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open Everyday from 5 a.m. – 1 a.m.

Chikara Meshi 東京チカラめし

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Our next stop is Chikara Meshi. You might start to wonder what in the world am I doing to introduce beef again. Well, have you tried a grill beef bowl on an iron board? I am not kidding. Yes, the stuff of Chikara Meshi will put the beef on an iron board in order to maintain the heat of the meat and cook the vegetables for you. You can consider eating at Chikara Meshi as having an individual teppanyaki meal. The only difference is that ordering a grill beef set with vegetable and miso soup costs you 500 yen.  Oppositely, teppanyaki restaurants cannot provide you the meal with the exact same price. If you don’t want to try to iron board meal, you can still try other grill bowls.

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Chikara Meshi Information

You can visit Chikara Meshi’s website here. Website (Japanese). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese)Twitter, and Instagram.

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open Everyday from 5 a.m. – 3 a.m.

Matsuya 松屋

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Since 2005, Matsuya starts to expand their business network to the United States. Individuals might have already heard about this restaurant. Although Matsuya sells similar meals as Yoshinoya and Chikara Meshi, Matsuya still has its selling point. They provide vegetable salad with three to four different dressings. They also offer miso soup with unlimited refill. Thus, if you don’t like eating too much meat, Matsuya’s food can be a blessing for your digestive system. Besides beef or pork bowl, Matsuya also serves customers with diverse curry sets and other seasonal set meals. Guests can always find surprise while eating in Matsuya. When you pass by one of them, make sure to try it out.

Matsuya Information

You can visit Matsuya’s website here. Website (English). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese), Twitter, and Instagram (Japanese).

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open 24 Hours

MOS Burger モスバーガー

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Restaurants endeavor to localize foreign food in order to satisfy local people’s flavors. For example, eating American food in Japanese style. MOS Burger is one of them. Have you heard about rice burgers? Pardon? Yea, you can find burgers made of rice in this fast food chain. The stuff from this restaurant also adds teriyaki sauce or other Japanese meat sauces and vegetables into the hamburgers. A simple burger can produce complicated flavors due to various dimensions of ingredients.

If you don’t want to drink soda, MOS Burger can offer you a cup of corn soup. Don’t forget the French fries as well because you can also find one of the thickest fries in here. Disregarding the set meal itself, you can exclusively buy a Japanese burger within 5 USD,

MOS Burger Information

You can visit MOS Burger’s website here. Website (English). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese)Twitter, and Instagram (Japanese).

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open Everyday from 5 a.m. – 3 a.m.

Saizeriya サイゼリヤ

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Living in Japan sometimes causes you to be homesick because you occasionally miss the food back home. You want to have pasta, pizza, steak, and cheesecake. Well, Saizeriya can satisfy all of your appetite because it is an Italian fast food chain. Customers only need to spend 500 yen ordering a set lunch, which include one main course, unlimited cups of soup, and one dish of vegetable salad. All other pasta and pizza only cost you 500 yen.

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Have you heard about Doria? Doria is similar to gratin, but people put rice instead. People add sauce, cheese, vegetables, and meat on the top, and then put in the oven and bake it. My dear friends, Doria is prominent in the Japanese world. I highly recommend you to try it. Besides the food you have ordered, you just need to add 190 yen to have unlimited, self-service drinks.

Saiziriya Information

You can visit Saiziriya’s website here. Website (Japanese). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese)Twitter, and Instagram (Japanese).

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open Everyday from 10 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Tenya天丼てんや

Cheap Tokyo Restaurants

Tendon is one of the luxury cuisines in Japan due to its ingredients. One bowl of tendon consists one to two pieces of shrimp, some seafood, and vegetables. If you go to a high-class restaurant, one set mean can cost you few thousand yen to 20,000 yen. However, you can make a deal with Tenya in 500 yen. With the unique tempura sauce on the top of the rice, you will recognize that tendon is a miracle!

Tenya Information

You can visit the website here. Website (English). Follow them on social media at Facebook (Japanese), Twitter , and Instagram (Japanese).

For your convenience, here is the List of Locations.

Hours of Operation: Open Everyday from 11 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Eating in low-priced restaurants with delightful food will definitely uplift the quality of your trip. Therefore, if you haven’t been one of those restaurants, you probably miss out a chance to experience of Japanese fast food culture. Furthermore, when you go to one of those restaurants, please remember to say “hi” to me!

March 6, 2017 0 comment
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samurai museum

samurai museumThe cultural hub in Shinjuku called “Kabukicho” is home to the many different stores and buildings that embody a section of Japanese culture. Among the shops and attractions is one that stands out to tourists and those interested in the warrior culture of medieval Japan. The Samurai Museum is dedicated to these brave warriors, and inside are fantastic displays of their armor and weapons. Each artifact has a history behind it.

samurai museum shinjuku 3The Samurai Museum offers tours in both Japanese and English. They delve deeply into the samurai culture, and visitors can learn a great deal about their lives and how they fought.  Though the museum may seem small, it contains five different exhibits which displays the different parts of the lives of samurai.

samurai museum 9The Samurai Museum also offers “Tate and Iai,” a showy instruction that demonstrates the Japanese “Way of the Sword.” It is very engaging and, because of the small area of the room, and you are very close to the demonstration–so close that the blade may sometimes be only inches from your face! The Samurai Museum instructors offer bolder visitors a chance to try the “Tate and Iai” along with the instructor and experience a small Japanese battle scene! But you shouldn’t go into battle unprotected, which is why you should don the o-yoroi samurai armor before engaging the enemy. Also, make sure you get your picture taken! The demonstration occurs four times a day, at 13:00, 15:00, 17:00 and 19:00.

samurai museum 4

samurai museum 7Even if you end up in a rush and can’t take the time to explore the museum, stop by the gift shop when you pass by! They offer items such as replica swords, armor, shirts, mugs and other items as souvenirs or gifts.

And since you’ll want to upload your photos right away, they have free wi-fi!

samurai museum shinjuku 8

Samurai Museum Shinjuku Location Information

Website (English) ||| Facebook (English) ||| Twitter (English) ||| Instagram

Nearest Station: 10-minute walk from Shinjuku Station (click on the Google Map for walking directions)

Hours of Operation: Open Daily 10:30 am – 9pm (last entry 8:30 pm)

Entrance Fee: 1800 yen for adults, 800 yen for children under 12, children 3 and under free. Plus souvenirs!

“Why Go?”: What? I can’t believe anyone would have to explain this to you! Weren’t you ever a kid?

Click on one of the links below to explore more of Tokyo–

December 14, 2016 0 comment
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Sushi Academy Shinjuku 1

Sushi Academy Shinjuku 1

Have you ever wondered how to make sushi? Of course you have! You’re traveling to Japan, after all. At the Tokyo Sushi Academy, students are taught how to master the art of sushi making, so they can take their knowledge and bring it back to their home countries.

EnAbleJapan.com was lucky to have the opportunity to sit down and interview Ms. Sachiko Goto, the principal of the Tokyo Sushi Academy. We also had the opportunity to talk to a student at this school, Teddy, who owns Maki & Ramen Sushi Bar in Edinburgh, Scotland. “I want to improve my sushi by learning about authentic sushi to bring back to Scotland,” he told us. To learn more about this unique school, watch our video below!

Sushi is popular all over the world, and sushi chefs are always in demand. The Tokyo Sushi Academy began operation in 2002, and since then over 4,000 people have graduated from their program, with 300 graduating every year. According to Principal Goto, students come to the school to learn “a very traditional style [of sushi], but most of the students graduate and go abroad to work.” Therefore, they must also learn to make modern-style sushi, such as sushi rolls. “We teach 70% traditional style, and 30% modern style,” she says.

While most sushi chefs enter the industry by just watching and copying other sushi chefs, students of the Tokyo Sushi Academy will enter the workforce with professional training, guaranteed to give them the upper hand. That is why aspiring sushi professionals come to Tokyo Sushi Academy; what better place to study sushi-making than in the birthplace of sushi? All of Tokyo Sushi Academy’s instructors are Japanese professional sushi chefs. “They were all skilled sushi chefs before, with more than 50 years experience,” says Principal Goto. You can find a list of instructors and their credentials here.

Tokyo Sushi Academy is also the only sushi school in Japan that offers instruction in English. 80% of students are Japanese, and the remaining 20% are from all over the world. But not to worry–students do not need to master Japanese in order to learn here. Interpreters work closely with students to translate the class from Japanese to English, so students are not left behind.

Tokyo Sushi Academy Curriculum

An old Japanese saying is that to master sushi, you need “three years in rice cooking, eight years in sushi-making.” Tokyo Sushi Academy understands that you probably don’t have that kind of time. “It takes a very long time to be a sushi chef, and our school is the first in Japan to teach sushi chef skills and to shorten the training time,” Principal Goto explains. All their courses are intensive, so that students can master the necessary skills in a short period of time.

We asked Principal Goto about a typical day of class for the students. “In the morning, students will come to the classroom and prepare fish,”  she says. “One day, salmon, another day, tuna, and another day, scallop or mackerel. Every day they will try different types of fish preparation. After they are prepared, they learn how to slice sashimi into sushi. In the afternoons, they learn roll sushi-making and nigiri sushi-making.”

Sushi Academy Shinjuku 2

Does this sound good to you? Well the Tokyo Sushi Academy is always looking for students! Here’s the courses that the school offers–

Sushi Private Lessons for Pros are available for the sushi professional on a tighter schedule, and can be organized to suit the needs of the student. The class content can also be tailored to what you would like to learn. Two days of lessons (3 hours a day) typically costs ¥80,000, but price varies based on the lesson subject matter. For more information on this class, click here.

The Private Lesson for Fun is great for the non-professionals who are only in Japan for a short time (such as tourists) and want to learn about sushi preparation. You don’t have to be a chef to take this course; you don’t even have to be good at cooking! Tokyo Sushi Academy can organize the lesson’s time and content to suit your needs, and you will be taught by their experienced sushi chefs. The price for this one-day, three-hour lesson is ¥40,000, but the amount varies based on the lesson subject matter. For more information, click here. This course is also for people who are considering the 1-year course, but want “a trial course” to get a feel for how the school is run.

Once a student finishes one of the main courses of instruction (with the exception of the Private Lesson for Fun), you will be awarded a Certificate of Completion.

Sounds Great, But Where Am I Going To Live?

Of course, finding a place to stay in Tokyo for 10 days or 8 weeks or a year can be a task unto itself. The Tokyo Sushi Academy can help you find a place, but scheduling it and paying for it is up to the individual students. See their information page on accommodations for details.

The Tokyo Sushi Academy of Singapore

Tokyo Sushi Academy also has a branch in Singapore. To find out more, click here.

Tokyo Sushi Academy Shinjuku Information

Website | Facebook | Instagram | Telephone: 81-3-3362-1755

Nearest Station: 1-minute walk from Nishi-Shinjuku Station (Tokyo Metro Marunouchi Line)

“Why Go?”: It’s the first step on your journey to become the greatest sushi chef in the world!

Click on one of the tags below to explore other travel options in Tokyo–

October 13, 2016 0 comment
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Shinjuku Station Shopping Tokyo Japan

Shinjuku Station Shopping

Shinjuku Station Shopping Tokyo Japan

Are you on an extended layover in Haneda? Waiting for the bullet train to bullet out of town? Want to do some shopping and maybe get a light meal, but you don’t want the hassle of navigating unfamiliar Tokyo streets? Shinjuku Station Shopping could be right for you!

Shinjuku Station is not just a train station, it’s also a gigantic shopping center. As such, it is an easy shopping and dining option for those who don’t have a lot of time or are reluctant to brave the Tokyo streets. But where are the best places to go? Shinjuku Station is gigantic, and you may not have the time to wander around forever in search of the perfect gift or that can’t-do-without item. Here are EnAbleJapan.com’s top places in Shinjuku Station Shopping, so you can explore (instead of sitting around on your smartphone like everyone else).

Isetan

Isetan is a Japanese department store that is so large, it has its own station exit. Isetan is also a great last-minute souvenir place, with Japanese alcohol and dessert packages designed with the traveler-on-the-go in mind. The second floor also features many clothing brands, like Dolly Girl by Anna Sui and Next B. by Agnes B. These fashion brands have a kawaii touch, so depending on who you’re shopping for, this could be a good place to go. It also has its own underground food court.

BIC Camera

Bic Camera Shinjuku Station Tokyo Japan

BIC Camera is a go-to spot for newbies in Japan. Shinjuku Station’s BIC Camera is located outside of exit B16. The two-floor store offers prepaid SIM cards for different phones, for different months, and for different amounts of data. They also sell power adapters, if your devices’ plugs won’t fit in Japan’s two-pronged outlets. If you are just arriving in Japan, we recommend stopping in BIC Camera to set up everything for your trip.

Sekaido Shinjuku

Sekaido Shinjuku, located at Exit C1, is a store that specializes in art materials and stationery. They have a wide selection of postcards and Japanese-style stickers, which could be great souvenirs to bring back home. There are plenty of choices, and the prices at Sekaido won’t break the bank.

UNIQLO

Uniqlo Shinjuku Station Shopping Tokyo Japan

Uniqlo is a popular brand all over the world, and has a huge store right in Shinjuku Station. They are known for their basic clothing pieces and low prices, and have something for the whole family. The 2nd floor of Uniqlo also offers embroidery design, so you can put small pictures or your name in kanji on clothes you buy (500 yen per word/ picture).

Kinokuniya Bookstore

Kinokuniya Bookstore is located by exits B7 and B8. Kinokuniya Bookstore’s 7th floor English bookstore sells a vast array of new books, bestsellers, genre books, and anything else you could find in a big-box bookstore. Of special interest are the section of books by Japanese authors that are translated to English, so you may find a treasure here that may be hard to get (or even browse for) anywhere else. There is also a travel section, where you will find Japanese maps, guidebooks, must-buy item guides, restaurant passports, and English manga. A great place to pick up airplane reading material! Outside the exit one can find a number of reasonably-priced restaurants with few crowds and many choices (such as curry, pasta, udon, yakisoba, sushi, etc.).

13th Floor Roof Garden

Air Garden Shinjuku Station Tokyo Japan

If you’re searching for something a little more relaxing, check out the 13th floor roof garden on top of the station. To get there, take exit E8 Takashimaya, and take the elevator all the way up. From there, you will have a perfect view of the Shinjuku area. There are plenty of seats, and many restaurants and cafés, too.

Tokyu Hands Shinjuku Station

Tokyu Hands is a store within Takashimaya department store. Tokyu Hands is one of those places that has everything–clothes, jewelry, bags, shoes, and other luxury goods. Brands include Chanel, Coach, Dolce & Gabbana, Bvlgari, and Gucci. Many products from these brands are exclusive to Japan, so if you’re looking for something unique and in-style, Tokyu Hands is your place.

NEWoMan

Newoman Shinjuku Station Shopping Tokyo Japan

NEWoMan is located right by the South Exit. It is eight stories of clothing and shoe stores, sweets shops, and even an outdoor area available for dining. On the first floor is Akomeya Tokyo, a rice specialty shop. They sell rice cookers, utensils, and sake cups for the discerning rice (and rice-product) enthusiast.

Shinjuku Station Shopping Location Information

For further shopping options in Tokyo, please click on one of the articles below–

July 6, 2016 0 comment
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Robot Restaurant Shinjuku

Robot Restaurant Shinjuku

The Robot Restaurant Shinjuku is insane. There is nothing quite like it in Tokyo, nor anywhere else. I don’t even know if we can refer to it as merely a restaurant–the Robot Restaurant is an energetic, robo-centric show located in the Kabukicho district of Shinjuku. And you certainly can’t miss it, seeing that it is a huge building with large flashy lights and robot techno music blaring from the speakers.

The Pre-Show Experience

The Robot Restaurant is touristy–they know it, and they love to flaunt it. From what we saw, more than 90% of the guests were foreign visitors, mostly North Americans. All the signs are shown prominently in English, and there are a number of foreign staff that speak native-level English.

A single ticket is a hefty ¥8000, though you can get ¥500 off when buying tickets in advance from their site, or 15% off through Voyagin. A bento to eat during the performance costs another ¥1000, which must be reserved before the performance, and beers and soft drinks are another ¥500-¥600 each. There are three shows per day during the week and a fourth on Saturday (showtimes), and each show runs for 90 minutes. However, you must be in the building at least 30 minutes prior to the performance, meaning that you should set aside a minimum two hours for the experience.

As soon as you enter, you are struck by the outrageously tacky décor, designed with a wink-and-nudge of giggly self-awareness. All guests are funneled to the third floor waiting room, and from there are directed to the bar and the seats by the English-speaking staff. There was a robot-costumed saxophone and guitar player playing jazz while we waited for the start of the performance, perfectly setting the mood for the wacky night ahead. Food and drinks could be ordered from the waiting room, and the prices are what you’d expect for such a tourist-heavy establishment (Eg. ¥600 for beer and ¥1400 for an American-styled “Mega Burger”).

Robot Restaurant Shinjuku

The Show

When it’s time for the performance to start, the staff leads the guests down a staircase of lizard sculptures and tactile paintings to the performance area. The seating is cramped, a tight spot to sit for a 90-minute performance. If you pre-ordered a bento during reservation, then you’ll collect them here, or you can purchase popcorn and drinks from the staff circulating through the room. There are three bento options available–grilled boneless short ribs, ginger-simmered beef in sweetened soy sauce, and sushi. All three bento are on the small side, but you aren’t actually here for dinner, are you?

Robot Restaurant Shinjuku

The show itself is excellent. The action is loud and flashy, with a surprisingly large and varied cast of robots appearing throughout the performance. The first segment is an eclectic taiko performance, fusing a traditional Japanese drum with—well, robots, obviously! The part we liked the most was the “Robot Wars” segment, which tells us the laughably wacky story of a war between animals and the “Robot Empire.” The action-packed story between the animals and the robots was funny and familiar, almost as if the action figures from my childhood came to life off of my bedroom floor and played out their battles in grand fightin’ robot fashion. The scale of the performances is quite extraordinary, and the performers are well-rehearsed and had lots of energy.

There is a 15-minute intermission every 30 minutes so the set pieces can be changed for the next performance. During intermissions the staff circulates through the audience, selling souvenirs and refreshments. There’s plenty of time to get another drink or make that bathroom trip without missing the action, not to mention the opportunity to get one of those sweet Robot Restaurant T-shirts!

The Robot Restaurant might be a touristy thing to do, but that doesn’t make it any less worthwhile. It might be pricey, but you are guaranteed a fun night full of battlin’ robots!

Robot Restaurant Location Information

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Reservations Online | Get 15% off with a reservation through Voyagin!

Reservations by Phone in English: 03-3200-5500

Nearest Station: 8-minute walk from Shinjuku Station (click on the map for walking directions)

Showtimes: 4:00PM (Sat only), 5:55PM, 7:50PM, 9:45 PM. Shows are 90 minutes in duration; guests must arrive 30 minutes prior to showtime.

Estimated Price: ¥8000-¥10000 for tickets, drinks, and bento; more for souvenirs

“Why Go?”: Watch the crazy fun robot performance!

Click on one of the tags below to explore other shopping and entertainment options in Tokyo–

June 28, 2016 0 comment
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Tutuanna

There are more than a few clothing stores that any fashionista visiting Tokyo needs to stop by. Shops like Stussy, WEGO and Shibuya 109 are some of the top places to go for the main pieces of your ensemble, but for the little odds and ends that complete your look head to tutuanna.  With locations all throughout Tokyo, including Shinjuku, Shibuya and Harajuku, tutuanna is super convenient.
Tutuanna Finding lingerie and hosiery in Tokyo that fits foreigners can be disheartening (for a general article on finding western-sized clothing in Japan, click here). But tutuanna carries a surprisingly large variety of sizes that anyone can fit into. Tutuanna‘s goods are adorably girly and cute and often come in matching sets. So whether you’re into lace or ruffles, you’ll find whatever makes you feel feminine and beautiful.

Beyond lingerie, tutuanna also offers an impressive assortment of tights, socks and legwear. While you can get your traditional ankle and knee socks here, tutuanna really specializes in the no-show cotton liner socks that keep your kitten heels or ballet flats from rubbing against the delicate skin of your feet as you explore the many shopping streets of Tokyo. Along with unique socks, tutuanna also sells gel cushions to make those heels a bit more comfortable! If you need that last little something to complete your outfit, go and seek out the closest tutuanna location!
For more ideas of trendy stores to visit, try reading our articles Shopping Slightly Off Harajuku’s Beaten Path: Cat Street and Harajuku Street Fashion: Takeshita-dori’s Top 5 Clothing Stores.

Tutuanna Harajuku Store Information

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Online Store
Nearest Station: 3-minute walk from Harajuku Station (Yamanote Line)


Hours of Operation: Everyday 11:00AM-8:30PM
Estimated Price: ¥350-¥1300
“Why Go?”: If you want a large variety of fashionable lingerie with several sizes that foreigners can fit into.
Click on one of the tags below to explore other shopping options in Tokyo–

June 21, 2016 0 comment
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Ebisu Garden Place Observation Deck, Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo is worth way more than 36 hours of your time. Tokyo is such a massive sprawling beast of a metropolis that you could never see the many facets of the city in such a short time. That said, 36 hours of Tokyo is better than no hours of Tokyo, and if you only have a bit of time to spare, we’ll do our best to show you Tokyo at its best.

For lodging, I suggest AirBnB as a way to rent a space because it is less hotel and more apartment. Another idea is the capsule hotel, which is not for the claustrophobic. Yet another adventurous idea is getting an overnight comic book or Internet café room. All of these have options in the Shibuya area, so I suggest starting there. Bring your energy because you’ll need it to run all over Tokyo.

Day 1 – Embrace the Touristy Side of Tokyo

9:00 a.m. Shibuya

For many of the AirBnB visitors, staying near Shibuya area means you will need to ride into Shibuya from nearby stations like Sangenjaya Station, Shimokitazawa Station, or Ebisu Station. Trains are known for being absolutely insane during morning and evening rush hour when workers are heading in and out of work.  Find a safe corner to watch the insanity unfold with a coffee and a bagel.

While in Shibuya it is practically a requirement to check out the famous scramble crosswalk and Hachiko Square. Tokyu plaza is right next to it with some cute shops to wander as well. Once you have had your fill and the station begins to be less of a madhouse, head into the station proper. It is totally worth the trouble to pay the 500 yen for a PASMO or Suica train card because you can repeatedly charge it and skip the trouble of micromanaging your fare. With your IC card pass, take the JR Yamanote line (look for green JR signs) and head to Harajuku, one stop away.

10:00 a.m. Harajuku/Meijinjingunmae

Harajuku is well known for Takeshita Street, the hub connecting Harajuku Station to the Omotesando area. Takeshita Street is full of youthful energy and shops with goods ranging from crazy costumes to female fashion styles like girlish skirts and blouses all the way to goth and punk attire.

As you leave Harajuku and enter Omotesando, the area gets more sophisticated glam. Omotesando has one of my favorite souvenir shops in all of Tokyo called Oriental Bazaar which is well worth a look for gifts. You can either backtrack to Harajuku to ride two stops on the Yamanote line to Shinjuku Station, or you can head into Meiji-jingumae Station to ride the Fukutoshin line up to Shinjuku-sanchome Station. By then, you probably will be getting hungry and can grab lunch.

12:00pm Bask in the touristy glow of Shinjuku

Shinjuku station is the busiest station in the world so can be quite difficult to navigate, but is a great place to people-watch as you try and find your way around to the correct exit. Shinjuku’s East End is my preferred neighborhood in Shinjuku because unlike West Shinjuku, where the government buildings are, East Shinjuku is more a retail area where you can hang out. Catch lunch in one of the many department stores or street level shops. As a personal suggestion, Korean food in Lumine EST is pretty tasty and easy to access on the upper floors of the department store.  Save room though because I definitely have a suggestion for dessert. One of the latest Tokyo crazes for sweets is located right at Shinjuku East End. It is the Croissant Taiyaki. Cronuts (croissant donuts) have nothing on this, I promise you. If you don’t like traditional red bean paste filling, try the custard or a seasonal flavor. If you like sweets, your stomach will thank me.

But what you’ll really thank us for is directing you to the Robot Restaurant, which is one of the craziest dinner shows you will ever experience. Even better, our good friends at Voyagin can get you a discount on your reservation!

After getting your Taiyaki, say goodbye to Shinjuku. From here I would suggest taking the Sobu line to Akihabara Station. This train line cuts across the Yamanote loop. 

2:30 p.m. Nerd out like a boss in Akihabara

Akihabara is called Electric Town, and rightfully so since it is a playground for tech-minded people. It is also a highly unique area of Tokyo that has a different feel from other parts of the city. Arcades line the main streets and girls dressed in frilly uniforms call out to passersby to visit their maid cafes. Play a few arcade games, grab some new headphones, or discover what maid/butler cafes are all about.

Akihabara Stores, Akihabara, Tokyo

Optional: If you take one look at Akihabara area and pale at the idea of spending time here, take the Shinjuku line to nearby Jimbocho Station. A book lover’s paradise, the area contains unique bookshops that will delight a different sort of traveler from Akihabara’s tech and anime fans.

An even better option is putting on a costume, renting a Go Kart, and riding around Akihabara to live out your favorite video game fantasy! C’mon, you know you want to. Let our friends at Voyagin help you book your rental!

Spend a bit of time taking in the sights and emptying your wallet before hopping back onto the Yamanote line again to Tokyo Station.

5:00 p.m. Tokyo and Meguro Station combo

Tokyo Station is a thing to behold. It is a massive complex of train lines all meeting near the city centre, where you can go to any other part of Japan via the Shinkansen bullet-trains. Even if you do not step outside of the station, it will truly amaze you to see all the stores and eateries in the sprawling underground hub. If you do decide to head out of the station, make sure to take a look at the newly renovated Tokyo Station—what’s old is new again because the station is modeled to look as it did a hundred years ago.

If you have had your fill of Tokyo Station and have time to spare, go back on the Yamanote line to head to the next destination, Meguro Station. The inside of Meguro Station is connected to shopping centers Arte1 and Arte2. Arte2 has a fun and well-known conveyor belt sushi restaurant. Eating raw fish and rice is an adventure for the new inductee if there ever was one. If raw fish isn’t your thing, Arte 2 also has a fusion restaurant called Yuuan that has heated food.

After your belly is full of raw fish or cooked eats, get back on Yamanote to go one train stop to Ebisu Station.

8:00 p.m. Get your drink on in Ebisu

Yebisu Garden Place Tower can be ridden to the upper floors to sneak a peek of the city skyline without the long lines or payment like Skytree and Tokyo Tower.

Ebisu

There are also restaurants upstairs if you decided to skip Meguro Station. The Ebisu area has plenty of bars for an after-dinner drink, and I heartily suggest Bar Martha, Red Dragon, or Buri. Bar Martha is one part jazz bar, one part Japanese whisky fan, and one part mixology. The dim, relaxing atmosphere will be a nice place to kick back after running all over the city, and the tasty snack jars will keep you from needing a midnight snack. Red Dragon is a Japanese take on a pub, with plenty of beer types to keep you going if you prefer a more excitable location. If you are looking for something a little more club and a little less straight up bar, check out Buri. It has a full bar, but it is well known for its semi-frozen one-cup sake. It is also a place where a lot of hookups happen, if that is your sort of thing.

Once you are done with your evening bar hop, call it a night and head back to your accommodations. Be warned, Tokyo does not have all night trains and buses so depending on time you might have to get a cab.

Day 2—The Triangle Experience

8:00 a.m. Breakfast in Shibuya

A bright and early morning awaits your fast-paced tour of Tokyo, especially if you’re jet lagged. Fight fire with fire by heading to your nearest Matsuya for breakfast. They have breakfast plates, but I would suggest the beef bowl with egg on top. It comes with miso soup and will help nurse any lingering hangovers you might be struggling with. Double dare you to try it with a side of natto!

9:00 a.m. Corner 1: Hipster delights in Nakameguro

Today is a bit slower pace. Take the Tokyu Toyoko line to Nakameguro Station and head out of the city center into a slightly more mellow area using what trains call the triangle ticket. Nakameguro Station’s surrounding area was featured in Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown as a hipster neighborhood. The Meguro River cuts across the station, making it an ideal place for cute cafés and small shops to line the tiny street and there are plenty of places to snack, buy gifts, and take photos.

10:30 a.m. European influence in corner 2: Jiyugaoka

Once you have had your fill of Nakameguro’s charm, take the Toyoko line further out of the city center by four stops to Jiyugaoka Station where you can mill about a very particularly styled shopping area and eat lunch. This area is known for being inspired by French culture and has plenty of places to try. I would suggest the taco rice for lunch at the Okinawan eatery Taiyou Shokudou. After you have wandered around to your satisfaction, get on the Tokyo Oimachi line over to Todoroki Station.

1:00 p.m. Escape the city without stepping out of Tokyo at Todoroki Valley

Todoroki Station is a way to escape the city without ever leaving it. Truly the definition of suburb, this adorable neighborhood is not a shopping hub like previous locations. Instead, head into Todoroki Valley to experience another, greener side of Japan. Todoroki Valley is amazing. Others have gone so far as to call it a godsend. After all the experience of the city, the trees and quiet sounds of water flowing downstream is a relief. Walking along the river from the station leads to a set of stairs that go up to the temple Fudoson where you can pay your respects, enjoy the view of the waterfall, or relax at the seated cliffside view. Backtrack to the station and re-board the Omiya line for Futakotamagawa Station.

3:00 p.m. Futakotamagawa: Last corner of the triangle

Futakotamagawa Station is based along the Tamagawa River. The side you are on is the Tokyo Metropolitan area and the other side is Kanagawa prefecture. It is worthwhile to walk a bit out of the area first (approximately 20 minutes) or to cab it to the Okamoto Park Old Farmhouse Garden. The park contains an old thatch roof farmhouse where you can see Japanese architecture and culture from the late Edo period (1860s), and it feels like you are stepping out of time. It is open until 4:30 p.m. and closed on Mondays, so mind your timing to ensure you get to see the house and surrounding area. One of the impressive parts of the area is how seamlessly it blends old and new Tokyo together as new shopping malls exist alongside older establishments. Any last minute shopping you need done can be taken care of at the mall surrounding the station or once you get to your airport. 

Ebisu Garden Place Tower, Ebisu, Tokyo, Japan

For more ideas on how to spend a short stay in Tokyo, visit 36 Hours in Tokyo: Kids in Tow.

June 13, 2016 0 comment
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Robot Restaurant Shinjuku

Part of the thrill of visiting Tokyo is experiencing all of the delightfully strange things that make the city unique. And the biggest thrill is to check out some of the awesome theme restaurants in Tokyo. Here are the top picks from Enablejapan.com for theme restaurants and cafes in Tokyo.

Tokyo Theme Restaurants : Cat Cafes

Although not strictly in the “theme restaurants” genre, cat-lovers from around the world always ask us about cat cafes. There are several cat cafes in Tokyo where you pay to enjoy the company of cats. Most have an entrance fee or require you to buy food and drinks, but this doesn’t bother you, right? After all, you’re there to meet the kitties! There are lots of cats around who want to play or be stroked. For more information, visit our top 15 recommendations for Tokyo cat cafes or watch Part II of our Tokyo Animal Cafe video series featuring Cafe Neko JaLaLa.

Cure Maid Café

Cure Maid Cafe Theme Restaurants

Maid cafes are a uniquely-Japanese thing, and can be off-putting for visitors with conventional tastes. Given their propensity for the cutsey-poo dress-up and antics (particularly in Akihabara), you might walk away feeling kind of like you have just accidentally committed some sort of perverted act. However, Cure Maid Cafe is more Victorian and less cutesy, allowing you to enjoy the experience without having a crisis of conscience. Check out our review of the Cure Maid Cafe in Akihabara here!

Fukuro no Mise Tsukishima

Fukuro no Mise Theme Restaurants

Owls! Really, owl cafes are like cat cafes in that both animals seem to regard humans with thinly-disguised contempt. But you can visit this Tsukishima cafe and meet big owls, small owls, and many owls in between! Check out our review of Fukuro no Mise here!

If Fukuro no Mise is too far out of your away, you could always go to the Lovely Owl Cafe in Harajuku. Even better, you can make a reservation through Voyagin!

Kawaii Monster Cafe Harajuku

Kawaii Monster Cafe Harajuku Tokyo Japan

You don’t know Tokyo Weird until you know the Kawaii Monster Cafe. From the Monster Girl floor shows to the bizarre decor, it’s every stereotype of Japan kawaii culture all in one location. Go there, and have your camera ready for your future Facebook shots! Check out our review of the Kawaii Monster Cafe here!

You absolutely MUST go to the Kawaii Monster Cafe during your trip to Tokyo. Let Voyagin help you with your reservation!

The Lock-Up Shibuya

The_Lock_Up_Shibuya_Tokyo Theme Restaurants

This chain of izakaya horror-prison theme restaurants that has a presence in most of Tokyo’s busy areas. The Lock-Up experience starts immediately when one of the waitresses handcuffs you and leads you to your table. Once seated, you can choose from their menu of unusual food and unorthodox drinks. A cocktail served in a smoking science beaker, anyone? Sporadically throughout the evening, alarms will sound and the lighting will go dark as escaped criminals come to scare you at your table. Check out our review of the Lock-Up here!

Ninja Akasaka Restaurant

Ninja_Asakusa_Tokyo_07 Theme Restaurants

A little more expensive than the café options, but this theme restaurant is all about ninjas! At Ninja Restaurant, you can watch as they’ll break out into tricks and performances suddenly throughout your meal, set within an atmospherically designed dining room. The menu varies from Japanese to European, and the quality of the food is generally excellent. Check out our review of Ninja Akasaka Restaurant here!

Q-pot CAFE.

Q-Pot Cafe Harajuku Tokyo Japan

Life is sweet at the Q-pot CAFE. in Harajuku! Come by for the cakes and tarts, and then visit their store across the street for fashion accessories based on the sweets you just had! See our review of the Q-pot CAFE. here!

Robot Restaurant Shinjuku

Robot Restaurant Shinjuku Theme Restaurants

The Robot Restaurant in Shinjuku is a fairly recent addition to Tokyo’s lineup of theme restaurants. Here, you can enjoy a dinner show where the main feature is giant robots being controlled by pretty girls.  It’s an extremely flashy show, with lots of lights, noise and excitement that’s a fun one-off experience. See our review of the Robot Restaurant here!

If you plan on adding the Robot Restaurant to your “must-do” list, you can get a discount on Instant E-Tickets from Voyagin!

Tori no Iru Asakusa

Making New Friends at Tori no Iru Bird Cafe Asakusa Tokyo Japan

Once you’re done at the Sensoji Shrine, this little cafe is a must-see. They have several owls and a walk-in bird room where you can interact with dozens of parakeets and other birds. Re-enact Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds” by buying a small box of birdseed! See our review of Tori no Iru Asakusa here!

For more dining and entertainment options in Tokyo, check out the links below–

June 2, 2016 0 comment
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Top 5 Fall Foliage: Gotokuji Temple, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan

Though Japan’s internationally admired cherry blossoms typically come to mind when thinking of seasonal delights, the country is equally stunning during the fall. The brilliant crimson and golden leaves are a particularly nice touch of nature amidst the urban sprawl of Tokyo.

Here are 5 of our favorite fall foliage viewing spots in and around Tokyo that we recommend you visit this autumn.

A word of warning: head out early to avoid the camera and tripod-wielding photography enthusiasts that love to block the paths!

Yoyogi Park, Tokyo

 

If you’re looking for a spot to enjoy the autumn chill right in the heart of Tokyo, Yoyogi Park the perfect place to relax and and enjoy a lazy fall afternoon. You can either join in the fun and games or tuck yourself away into a quiet corner in the massive park.

Closest Stations: Harajuku Station, Meijijingu-mae Station

Fall foliage at Yoyogi Park, Tokyo

Shinjuku Gyoen, Tokyo

The nearby Shinjuku Gyoen is another wonderful place to enjoy the fall colors. Unlike Yoyogi Park, there’s a small entrance fee but you’re rewarded with a stillness and quiet that make you feel as if you stepped into another universe. And once you’re ready to take on the crowds again, you can enjoy some shopping in East Shinjuku.

 

Top 5 Fall Foliage: Gotokuji Temple, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan

Gotokuji Temple in Setagaya

 

Gotokuji, Setagaya, Tokyo

You know that adorable paw-waving cat (the maneki neko) that you see everywhere in Japan? Though the story changes, one version is that one day a daimyo was passing by a temple when his attention was caught by a cat that appeared to be beckoning him in. As soon as he entered, a downpour began. Feeling grateful that he avoided the storm, the daimyo afterwards bought and restored Gotokuji temple and the maneki neko has since been associated with good luck. So it’s no surprise that you’ll find thousands of the statues here, both large and small. You’ll also see retirees relax and paint as you wander through the small, but interesting temple grounds.

Address: Tokyo-to, Setagaya-ku, Gotokuji 2-24-7
Closest stations: Gotokuji Station, Miyano-saka Station
Note: It’s not a straight shot to Gotokuji from Gotokuji Station so you may want to use Miyano-saka Station instead.

 

Top 5 Fall Foliage: Manekineko at the Gotokuji Temple, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan

 

Mount Takao

If enjoy hiking, then you likely already know of Tokyo’s best hiking. With well-maintained paths of varying difficulties (and the monkey park!), Mt. Takao is a great place to visit any time of the year. The scenery here is particularly spectacular in the fall, however, and if you’re lucky you’ll be able to see Mount Fuji on a clear day. Trails can get crowded, so this is one spot you definitely want to arrive at early.

 

Fall foliage at Hondoji, Chiba, Japan

Hondoji Temple

Hondoji, Matsudo, Chiba

Though a bit out of the way compared to some of the other spots, Hondoji temple is a great place to enjoy the fall leaves. The old wooden buildings provide the perfect backdrop to the vibrant leaves. The grounds are spacious enough that you don’t have to jostle your way through the crowds and there are a variety of buildings and gardens to look at. Simply take the Chiyoda line to Kita-Kogane station and it’s a short walk from there.

Address: 63 Hiraga, Matsudo, Chiba 270-0002, Japan
Closest Station: Kita-Kogane Station.
Note: Kita-Kogane Station is easily accessed from Tokyo via the Chiyoda line.

 

Hondoji

 

 

 

 

 

November 12, 2015 0 comment
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Shinjuku Ni-chome, Tokyo, Japan

Shinjuku has quite a deep, dark, and complex history. From the 1960 riots and protests, to the controversial dark Kabukicho and performance arts, Shinjuku is an area littered with drama, controversy, and heresy. The most infamous area of which is Ni-chome.

 

HIV Prevention Sign, Ni-chome, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Walking through Ni-chome during the day seems like your normal, everyday stroll through Tokyo. Actually, you wouldn’t even notice that you’re in Ni-chome if it wasn’t for the few blatantly LGBTQ targeted signs and shops outside. But Ni-chome wasn’t always a neighborhood haven for this community. Rather, it was once a popular area for prostitution until it was made illegal in Japan by post-WWII allied forces. After that, the gay underground culture soon flourished in the void left by the absence of prostitution.

 

Club signs in Ni-Chome, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Ni-chome is an exciting area full of bars, clubs, restaurants, cafes, saunas, love hotels, gay pride boutiques, host clubs, nightclubs, massage parlors, parks, and gay book and video stores. I’ve been to Ni-chome on two occasions (I am a heterosexual man, by the way) and I enjoyed myself both times. If this is your first visit, I advise you to go with a LGBTQ friend as they can show you the ropes and take you somewhere safer than where you might wander into by yourself. Ni-chome can be just as dangerous as Roppongi or Shibuya, so you’ll have to be careful when you’re out there enjoying the evening/night, which means watching your drink, wallet, or purse.

Shinjuku Ni-chome, Tokyo, Japan

Streets of Ni-chome, Shinjuku, Tokyo

 

In addition to its nightlife, Ni-chome has a variety of restaurants, lounges, and cafes. So if clubbing isn’t your thing, head over to one of the other popular establishments, including famous Uoya-itchō (うおや一丁) and grab a bite, or the local cafè if you fancy a cup of coffee instead.

Ni-chome isn’t for your run-of-the-mill individual: you have to be seeking something a little extra if you are wanting to brave this storm. Ni-chome’s nightlife is the one of the best to be found in Tokyo, and perhaps in Japan. So prepare yourself for a wild night of fun, excitement, and—if you were like me, a heterosexual guy who has had very limited interaction with members of the LGBTQ community—a night you won’t soon forget.

November 6, 2015 0 comment
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